‘Right to work’ for less.

The HuffPo author states that this is unlikely to happen in other states, attributing this setback to political factors unique to Indiana; but I’m not nearly so optimistic.

Oklahoma was the most recent ‘right-to-work’ state, in 2001. More on that, from the Indianapolis Star.

While Morgan said Indiana should follow his state’s lead and adopt the law, saying it has spurred job creation, the union members told a different story.

“There is no doubt that the law has resulted in job loss and lower wages,” said Jesse Isbell, who worked for 36 years at the Bridgestone-Firestone tire plant in Oklahoma City.

That plant closed in 2006, and he and 1,400 others lost their jobs, he said, even though proponents had said the legislation was what was needed to keep jobs from leaving the state.

..and the SocialistWorker.

Pete Rimsans, executive director of the building trades union in Indiana, said that in 2001, when Oklahoma became the last state to adopt a “right to work” law, construction wages there and in Indiana were only 50 cents apart. Today, Rimsans said, the hourly construction wages in Oklahoma are $8.50 plus about $1.31 in benefits, while in Indiana, they are $21.92 an hour, with $10.65 worth of benefits.

What’s funny (ironic-funny, not haha-funny) is that the people likeliest to champion ‘right-to-work’ legislation tend to be free market capitalist types who claim to hold contractual agreements sacrosanct and have a kneejerk suspicion of any sort of government regulation; but that’s precisely what right-to-work laws are – in depriving workers of the possibility of negotiating a closed shop arrangement with employers, they’re a governmental intrusion on private contracts between sovereign in-duh-viduals in the free market. That means socialism & tyranny, right?

If only. ‘Free market’ ideologues have proven time & again that they’re perfectly cozy with government regulations insofar as they serve their interests.

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